marine species – Mustang Sailing http://mustangsailing.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 10:49:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mustangsailing.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-120x120.png marine species – Mustang Sailing http://mustangsailing.com/ 32 32 How withdrawing from the ISS could impact marine life https://mustangsailing.com/how-withdrawing-from-the-iss-could-impact-marine-life/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 14:02:17 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/how-withdrawing-from-the-iss-could-impact-marine-life/ After more than two decades of scientific service, the International Space Station (ISS) should say a final farewell. The research center has allowed us to expand our understanding of the Earth, the solar system and beyond. More than two hundred astronauts have visited the station, while researchers have conducted thousands of experiments and studies, from […]]]>

After more than two decades of scientific service, the International Space Station (ISS) should say a final farewell. The research center has allowed us to expand our understanding of the Earth, the solar system and beyond. More than two hundred astronauts have visited the station, while researchers have conducted thousands of experiments and studies, from researching the origin of stars to understanding the impacts of space on the human body. This space laboratory has touched and transformed almost every major scientific discipline.

Earlier this year, NASA announced plans for the station’s eventual retirement in 2031, but the 450-ton lab is unlikely to face a quick demise. After operations are completed, most dead satellites drift out of orbit and eventually burn up in Earth’s atmosphere.

However, most of the ISS will sink in Point Nemo, a remote region of the Pacific Ocean so far from Earth that many scientists call it a “space graveyard”, after the number of spacecraft buried in the grave. watery.

The isolated expanse of ocean is an ideal place for a spacecraft to crash without causing potential harm to humans or destruction to cities, as described by NASA in the ISS transition plan. The name “nemo” is Latin for “person” and, as its nickname suggests, it is uninhabited by humans. In fact, it is the farthest point of any landmass on Earth.

Point Nemo lies at 48°52.6′S 123°23.6′W in the Pacific Ocean. Google Earth

There is virtually no life in the nutrient-poor waters – the lack of biological diversity is one of the reasons Point Nemo is used as a galactic dumping ground. At one time, Point Nemo offered a perfect blank canvas to study a deep underwater location completely untouched by the human environment, says Leila Hamdan, associate director of the university’s school of ocean science and engineering. of southern Mississippi. Hamdan studies the biogeography of the deep sea, in particular how shipwrecks alter the biodiversity of the ocean floor.

But big tech exposed to the elements of space presents a whole different set of unknown variables. As the clock ticks on the impending aquatic fate of the ISS, some wonder how space exploration ultimately impacts marine life.

“Before we even have the technology to go [to Point Nemo]and put deep submersibles in the ocean and collected samples there, we already put the relics of space exploration there,” says Hamdan.

According to Hamdan, it is unclear whether the long-term effects of launching satellites into the ocean have a positive or negative impact on marine wildlife and local ecology. But shipwrecks could offer clues, she says.

When a ship runs aground, the microbes that surround the wreckage tend to be more diverse and play an important role in keeping the environment healthy. However, unlike ships that sail across the sea, these Earth-orbiting structures have traveled through space. The ISS, for example, contains decades of experimental equipment, materials and even traces of altered human DNA. It’s unclear what kind of long-term effects the craft — and what they’re carrying — will have on Earth’s seabed.

“It will be a very large human structure with a lot of human material, which is now resting on the seabed,” she says. “It would be naive to think that this is not going to change the ecology that is present.”

[Related: This meteor-tracking system could prevent a falling-rocket debris disaster]

Space debris is just one type of marine debris that contributes to the growing and widespread pollution of Earth’s oceans. According to the Office of Coastal Management, more than 800 marine species have been injured, sickened or died from consumer plastics, metal, rubber, paper and other debris. While the ISS is larger than most trash in the ocean, other experts worry less about its immense size compared to other sunken trash.

“If you look at the volume of the International Space Station, it’s nothing compared to an oil tanker,” says Cameron Ainsworth, associate professor of physical oceanography at the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science. An average 700-foot-long tanker easily exceeds the ISS’ end-to-end length of 356 feet, making the station equivalent to “a few tons of aluminum crashing into the ocean, which won’t have no more impact than a sinking ship.”

But as Earth’s orbit becomes increasingly cluttered with a host of space junk, those few hundred pounds of debris per craft will eventually pile up.

“The ocean is not an unlimited repository for all of our space junk,” says Erik Cordes, professor and vice president of biology at Temple University. Cordes, who was one of many experts called in to help after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, knows all too well the damage human activities can have on marine life.

While he understands the appeal of landing decommissioned spacecraft as far away from people as possible, Cordes says there are a lot of “unpredictable” consequences to dropping tons of scientific equipment into an area that scientists don’t. don’t know enough.

“People usually think of the deep sea as one big, muddy, barren desert, and it really isn’t,” he says. “The more we explore, the more we begin to discover some truly incredible habitats, ecosystems and animals at the bottom of the ocean.”

[Related: The ocean is a giant dump for chemical weapons. Can we clean it up before it’s too late?]

Marine scientists often have to resort to guesswork about what’s lurking on the ocean floor, Cordes says. But until they have real data, such as high-resolution maps and images to scan the deepest parts of the seafloor, more work is needed before it becomes possible to predict the impact. term, if any, of falling satellites into the Earth’s oceans.

NASA states in the ISS teardown debrief that impacts to marine life are likely to be minimal: “During descent through Earth’s atmosphere, the space station would burn, shatter and vaporize into fragments of varying sizes. Some station fragments [sic] would likely survive the thermal stresses of reentry and fall to Earth. The environmental impacts of this debris in the predicted impact area are expected to be low. »

When PopSci contacted NASA and other government agencies for comment, they said there was no official effort to track space debris after it fell into the ocean. There is still time to explore other avenues or implement marine habitat monitoring before the ISS begins its decommissioning plans in 2030. NASA writes in the transition plan that it will continue “ Investigate alternative footprint targets and ground paths for station disposal to minimize risk. for [sic] The population of the Earth. But until scientists know more, it’s a waiting game.

“I think with all the money we’re spending putting this thing out there,” Cordes says, “we should spend some money to find out what happens when it comes back down.”

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First-Ever Xposure Conservation Summit Highlights the Need to Conserve Marine Life and Protect the Oceans https://mustangsailing.com/first-ever-xposure-conservation-summit-highlights-the-need-to-conserve-marine-life-and-protect-the-oceans/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/first-ever-xposure-conservation-summit-highlights-the-need-to-conserve-marine-life-and-protect-the-oceans/ Sharjah: Prospects for ocean conservation received a promising boost as international photography festival Xposure opened its first-ever conservation summit here under the theme ‘Save Our Oceans’ to explore hope and solutions to safeguard the precious biodiversity of the world’s marine ecosystems. The one-day summit dedicated to ocean conservation and visual storytelling opened at the Sharjah […]]]>

Sharjah: Prospects for ocean conservation received a promising boost as international photography festival Xposure opened its first-ever conservation summit here under the theme ‘Save Our Oceans’ to explore hope and solutions to safeguard the precious biodiversity of the world’s marine ecosystems.

The one-day summit dedicated to ocean conservation and visual storytelling opened at the Sharjah Exhibition Center in the presence of Sheikh Sultan bin Ahmed Al Qasimi, Deputy Governor of Sharjah. Hosted in partnership with the International League of Conservation Photographers, the summit began with a short video showcasing the incredible beauty and diversity of ocean creatures found across the planet’s diverse climatic terrains.

The summit dedicated to ocean conservation and visual storytelling opened at Expo Center Sharjah in the presence of Sheikh Sultan bin Ahmed Al Qasimi.
Image Credit: Supplied

National Geographic explorers Brian Skerry, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes, Jeffrey Garriock and Laurent Ballesta, who witnessed the beauty and devastation that occurs in all ocean ecosystems and accumulated over 80,000 hours of combined documentation about underwater changes, shared their inspiring experiences with the audience. at the top.

Global concern

Addressing a distinguished assembly of environmentalists, biologists, ocean explorers, researchers and photographers, Mariam bint Mohammed Almheiri, Minister of Climate Change and Environment of the United Arab Emirates, expressed her gratitude to the Sharjah Government Media Office (SGMB) for drawing attention to a global concern and helping bring about active solutions to preserve the oceans and their wildlife. The Minister of Climate Change and Environment also thanked the International League of Conservation Photographers, conservationists and scientists participating in the Xposure Conservation Summit for their efforts in deliberating and formulating solutions to overcome the challenges facing the planet is facing.

Mariam bint Mohammed Almheiri, said: “The focus on the oceans at the Conservation Summit is a wise choice, as the oceans are the largest and most important ecosystem on our planet. Three quarters of our planet is covered by oceans. they are the largest carbon sinks in the world and the source of income for hundreds of millions of people around the world.

“The Importance of Marine Wealth”

The Minister said: “The marine environment of the United Arab Emirates has a very high biodiversity and our awareness of the economic, social and environmental importance of this marine wealth has led us to implement many measures to preserve and safeguard the sustainability of its resources and address issues that affect the health of the oceans.

The Minister highlighted the measures initiated by the United Arab Emirates to protect its marine environment, including the regulation of fishing activities, the expansion of the aquaculture industry, the creation of marine protected areas, the fight against marine pollution, the conservation of threatened marine species and rehabilitation of affected marine areas. She said the UAE’s goal to expand its mangrove coverage from 30 million to 100 million trees by 2030 has helped build the resilience of the country’s marine environment and maintain its global leadership. in the Marine Protected Area category of the Environmental Performance Index (EPI).

NAT 220209 XPOSURE ARAMZAN-30-1644501774542

A photograph by Tariq Zaidi on display at Expo Center Sharjah.
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan/Gulf News

Photographs capture distress calls

In her remarks, Alya Al Suwaidi, Director of SGMB, said: “The theme of the Conservation Summit, ‘Save our Oceans’, transforms the slogan from a simple title into hundreds, thousands and millions of images. compelling and dynamic ones that powerfully illuminate irreversible threats. facing the marine environment. It inspired Xposure to lead the effort to save the oceans and tell the stories of the dangers that lie ahead if no action is taken.

“There is hope for the oceans”

Delivering the keynote, Kathy Moran, former Deputy Director of Photography at National Geographic, said: “Despite the challenges of climate change, overfishing and plastic pollution, the one word that has been paramount is ‘amal or hope. There is hope when it comes to our oceans – always.

Citing recent actions that have inspired hope, Moran highlighted the support given to the UN by 100 countries, including the United Arab Emirates, to protect at least 30% of the world’s oceans by 2030, the tripling by Ecuador the size of its green reserves around the Galapagos Islands, and the announcement by the International Union for Conservation of Nature that several tuna species are no longer critically endangered.

Concerted actions taken by nations, including the UAE, have shown that marine protected areas can work, Moran said.

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Coastal marine life found living on ocean trash https://mustangsailing.com/coastal-marine-life-found-living-on-ocean-trash/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/coastal-marine-life-found-living-on-ocean-trash/ Plastic waste in the world’s oceans is affecting marine life in new and unusual ways, researchers recently reported. A group of American and Canadian scientists have discovered that certain species live on a large area of ​​plastic garbage floating in the Pacific Ocean. The team discovered animals such as ocean barnacles and crabs living alongside […]]]>

Plastic waste in the world’s oceans is affecting marine life in new and unusual ways, researchers recently reported.

A group of American and Canadian scientists have discovered that certain species live on a large area of ​​plastic garbage floating in the Pacific Ocean.

The team discovered animals such as ocean barnacles and crabs living alongside barnacles and coastal anemones.

Linsey Haram of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center was lead writer on the report that recently appeared in the publication Nature Communications.

“We expected to find ocean sailors species who have adapted on plastics, but we were…surprised to find coastal marine species as well,” Haram said.

It is unclear how some of the coastal marine life ended up in the ocean, Haram added.

“They may already be out there settling on the plastics, but they’re most likely … being transported from the coast on floating debris,” she told VOA.

Debris is another term for waste.

The study focused on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch between Hawaii and California. The patch, or area, covers more than 1.5 million square kilometers. Most of it is plastic waste.

The debris includes large amounts of very small pieces of plastic, as well as water bottles, toothbrushes and fishing gear. The waste is collected in circular ocean streams called gyres.

Plastics can float like this for years.

Amy Uhrin is chief scientist for the Marine Debris Program at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington.

The size of the patch can change depending on wind and ocean currents, Uhrin told VOA.

The Ocean Voyages Institute of Sausalito, California is a non-profit group working to remove waste from the ocean. He gave the researchers the debris needed for the study.

Ocean Voyages president Mary Crowley said a large vessel with special equipment was extracting tons of trash from the area. She said the effort is particularly aimed at eliminating “highly harmful items like plastic fishing nets that still catch and kill whales, dolphins and turtles.”

Ocean Voyages Institute in Sausalito, California works to clean up trash in the ocean.

The researchers were surprised by what they found.

“What was most telling was that coastal marine species were not only prosperous but by reproducing,” Haram said.

However, many questions are still unanswered.

“How do you survive on a piece of plastic in the middle of the ocean? asks Greg Ruiz of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and report writer.

“Coastal species can create their own ecosystem on plastic debris,” Ruiz said. Fish and bird waste in the water can provide food.

“We also want to understand how coastal and oceanic species interact as they compete for limited space on objects,” Haram said. “They could be used as a food source.”

There are also concerns that some of these creatures could become invasive species.

“We want to know if other coastal marine species are on plastics in the world’s five major ocean gyres,” Haram said.

Ruiz added: “We are concerned that coastal organisms from different regions could form colonies and spread diseases to other marine species, including fish.

I am John Russell.

VOA News reported this story. John Russell adapted it for Learn English.

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words in this story

garbage — n. things that are no longer needed or wanted and have been thrown away

species – nm biology: a group of animals or plants that are similar and can produce young animals or plants: a group of related animals or plants that is smaller than a genus

adapt – v. to change your behavior so that it is easier to live in a particular place or situation

prosper – v. grow or develop successfully: thrive or succeed

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Marine life can hang on to buy time in the face of global warming https://mustangsailing.com/marine-life-can-hang-on-to-buy-time-in-the-face-of-global-warming/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/marine-life-can-hang-on-to-buy-time-in-the-face-of-global-warming/ Jurgens’ research was conducted near Bodega Bay in northern California. Courtesy of Laura Jürgens Some marine species can help protect others from climate change by shielding them from heat, according to a new study by a professor at Texas A&M University in Galveston. Laura Jurgens, assistant professor of marine biology, and her colleagues at the […]]]>

Jurgens’ research was conducted near Bodega Bay in northern California.


Courtesy of Laura Jürgens

Some marine species can help protect others from climate change by shielding them from heat, according to a new study by a professor at Texas A&M University in Galveston.

Laura Jurgens, assistant professor of marine biology, and her colleagues at the University of Vermont and the University of California, Davis detail the findings in the current issue of Ecology.

The team studied how small crabs and isopods – which are marine versions of woodlice – that live on rocky shores respond to warming of their natural habitats on rocky shores. They discovered that the beds of mussels in which these animals live protect them from temperature variations and prevent them from drying out and dying in hot, sunny weather.

“These mussel beds provide a kind of ‘ecological climate control’ within their canopies, much like forests,” Jurgens said. “The results show how conserving habitats formed by plants and animals can help buy time for heat-sensitive species, helping them weather the short-term effects of climate change. But it also means that habitat destruction can make other species more vulnerable to global warming.

The research was conducted in marine areas near Bodega Bay in northern California.

Jurgens said that without the protection of mussel beds, some marine species cannot survive under current conditions.

“But they can tolerate even a worse climate scenario, perhaps as long as the year 2099, because the mussel bed environment remains intact,” she said. “This research shows that it is more important than ever to protect vulnerable habitats like mussel beds, which are threatened by trampling and destructive recreational mussel harvesting in many coastal areas of the United States.”

The study was funded by the National Science Foundation.

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Wellington.Scoop »Kete shaped tiles will be baskets for harbor marine life https://mustangsailing.com/wellington-scoop-kete-shaped-tiles-will-be-baskets-for-harbor-marine-life/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 22:19:55 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/wellington-scoop-kete-shaped-tiles-will-be-baskets-for-harbor-marine-life/ [ad_1] Press Release – Wellington City CouncilSpecial concrete tiles with a woven surface reminiscent of harakeke kete are attached to the new rock embankment at the southern end of Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbor) to help marine life take hold. Four of the eco-friendly tiles are already in place to test fixing methods, and 36 more […]]]>


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Press Release – Wellington City Council
Special concrete tiles with a woven surface reminiscent of harakeke kete are attached to the new rock embankment at the southern end of Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington Harbor) to help marine life take hold.

Four of the eco-friendly tiles are already in place to test fixing methods, and 36 more are being manufactured locally to enter soon.

The installation of the tiles is one of the many things that have been done in tandem with the development of new cycling and walking routes to improve the reclaimed area and the gateway to the city. Wellington City Council’s project also included the removal of over 400 trucks of old demolition material.

Similar types of tiles have been successfully installed on dikes in Sydney and Singapore in recent years, and tested in Auckland as part of the World Harbor Bivalve Restoration Project. However, it is believed to be one of the first times that this technique has been implemented on a larger scale in New Zealand as a permanent project.

It will also be an opportunity to test the approach in an area with strong swells.

The tiles provide rougher surfaces, edges, crevices and water retention holes on man-made structures, similar to those that occur on natural rocky shores, and will help increase biodiversity between the low tide area and high.

Taranaki Whānui administrator Holden Hohaia said that before the earthquake uprising and land reclamation in the area, what is now Rongotai and Kilbirnie was part of the sea. This was the area. and the Te Awa-a-Taia Canal that separated Te Motu Kairangi (Miramar Peninsula) from the area that is now Hataitai.

“It’s great that as we develop Tahitai – the eastern pedestrian and cycling connection – we’ve been able to clean up this area, remove demolition material from the seabed and foreshore, and find ways to protect and encourage the growth of marine life.

“Kete, traditionally woven from harakeke, is used to harvest kai moana,” he says. “It is hoped that the woven structure, shapes and cavities of these concrete slabs will over time perform a similar function, effectively becoming small baskets of marine life. “

Concrete tiles are manufactured locally by Hutt Concrete Products and were designed by Isthmus with ecological and technical advice and specifications from Tonkin and Taylor.

The remaining tiles will be attached to the rocks between the Calabar Road and Troy Street roundabouts in the intertidal zone at medium to low tide. This installation phase will take place early next year.

The 430m long rock cover ecological improvement plans, developed by Tonkin and Taylor ecologist Susan Jackson, will also include the use of drilling equipment to create holes, crevices and indentations in some of the rockfills.

Both approaches will be monitored by the Greater Wellington Regional Council in collaboration with Victoria University of Wellington to see if they encourage the growth of native marine species and how they behave in relation to the parts of the rock cover that are left as is.

Susan Jackson says ecological improvements, such as those at Cobham Drive, are increasingly common to deal with the loss of marine biodiversity seen along coasts that have been subjected to human-induced changes. The improvements are designed to improve the habitat of native species that have difficulty attaching themselves to the smooth, flat surfaces commonly seen on dikes, which are also often dominated by pest and invasive species.

Greater Wellington coastal scientist Dr Megan Melidonis says if the techniques prove to be effective and cost-effective, marine ecological improvements such as this are likely to be recommended or required more often as part of consents for protective structures. coastal area around the Greater Wellington region.

“Normally you won’t find much alive on the riprap, but if you look at the natural rocky areas near Cobham Drive you will notice species representative of what we would expect to see establishing on these man-made tiles. . Animals such as periwinkles, barnacles and limpets, and different types of algae and encrusting algae.

The penguins moving safely back and forth between the sea and future nests in the liner is something designers had to consider when considering the design of the tiles and other possible ways to help flora and marine fauna to settle on the coastal protection structure.

The rock covering was built to help prevent erosion on the most vulnerable part of the foreshore and to protect the national road and paths. As the area is impacted by the prevailing northerly winds, the liner has been designed to absorb and distribute the force of the sea, which also helps reduce the likelihood of sea spray in this area.

The Cobham Drive project, funded by Wellington City Council in partnership with Waka Kotahi, is part of Paneke Pōneke, an urban network of safe cycle paths and scooters that will get more people of all ages and abilities on the move low carbon pathways. It is also part of Te Aranui o Pōneke, the Great Harbor Way.

Deputy Mayor and Councilor for Motukairangi East Ward, Sarah Free, says the project aims to increase and protect our biodiversity and is an integral part of Wellington’s journey of environmental restoration on land and sea.

“Wellington is one of the few cities in the world where biodiversity is actually increasing, and we can be very proud of the work being done in all habitats, from our hills to the sea.

“The foreshore at Evans Bay has gone from being a litter-strewn area where I and other volunteers did monthly beach cleanups, to a much more attractive environment for people and nature.

“The mayor and I see the work of Cobham Drive contributing to our environmental restoration kaupapa (values), and mahi which will also lead us to become a carbon neutral city in 2050.”

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Scientists discover marine life on piles of ocean trash https://mustangsailing.com/scientists-discover-marine-life-on-piles-of-ocean-trash/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/scientists-discover-marine-life-on-piles-of-ocean-trash/ Marine life is determined to live, scientists have found, as they have discovered dozens of marine species thriving in the farthest reaches of the ocean, even among the piles of trash in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The garbage patch is a huge whirlwind of debris about twice the size of the state of Texas, […]]]>

Marine life is determined to live, scientists have found, as they have discovered dozens of marine species thriving in the farthest reaches of the ocean, even among the piles of trash in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The garbage patch is a huge whirlwind of debris about twice the size of the state of Texas, swirled around by water currents from the North Pacific. It is also called the Pacific Garbage Patch. The world has five such masses. This one, the largest of them all, was first documented around 1997, when a boater spotted a tangle of plastics, bottles and fishing nets floating nearby.

As sorry as it sounds, new findings suggest that marine species are colonizing these mountainous wastelands – in a recent paper, researchers recorded more than 40 coastal species clinging to the wreck, including mussels, barnacles, amphipods resembling shrimps, crabs, stars and sponges. “It’s almost like a new island has emerged,” Greg Ruiz, a scientist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, told NBC News, noting that it “represents a paradigm shift from what we thought was possible.”

In the past, scientists have observed that coastal species can travel the high seas on floating logs or driftwood, but once these organic materials dissolve, the species would be stranded in the middle of nowhere with no way to survive. The trash plastics, however, offer a lifeline of sorts, serving as a water-insoluble campsite for plants and animals. More surprisingly, the researchers found that coastal species – which are generally used to shorelines richer in food than the open ocean – could still forage for nutrients in waters far from their waste habitat. In short, they bloomed.

This discovery shook the foundations of marine ecosystems as we know them, casting doubt on existing beliefs that the longest stretches of the vast ocean were marine deserts unfit for life. Such a revelation could have ripple effects on the ocean food web or on the migrations of invasive species. Perhaps one day, coastal species might even feel more comfortable on a plastic raft wandering deep in the blue than on the edges of green land. “The evolutionary rate of change could be quite rapid,” Ruiz told NBC News. “We don’t know the answer for organisms in the trash. Certainly, the potential is there. »

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Research fellow, job in marine biology and ecology at the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON https://mustangsailing.com/research-fellow-job-in-marine-biology-and-ecology-at-the-university-of-southampton/ https://mustangsailing.com/research-fellow-job-in-marine-biology-and-ecology-at-the-university-of-southampton/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 04:34:51 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/research-fellow-job-in-marine-biology-and-ecology-at-the-university-of-southampton/ [ad_1] Marine biology and ecology Site: Southampton National Oceanographic Center Salary: £ 31,406 to £ 34,304Full-time fixed-term (3 years) Closing Date: Monday, November 15, 2021 Date of interview: Be confirmed Reference: 1515821HN Researchers are invited to apply to work as a researcher at the Coral Reef Laboratory at the University of Southampton (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/research/facilities/corals.page). At the […]]]>


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Marine biology and ecology

Site: Southampton National Oceanographic Center
Salary: £ 31,406 to £ 34,304
Full-time fixed-term (3 years)
Closing Date: Monday, November 15, 2021
Date of interview: Be confirmed
Reference: 1515821HN

Researchers are invited to apply to work as a researcher at the Coral Reef Laboratory at the University of Southampton (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/research/facilities/corals.page). At the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the National Oceanography Center in Southampton, you will join a community of over 500 researchers and support staff from physics, chemistry, biology, geoscience and engineering , with a strong emphasis on marine biology and the marine environment, to work in a project at the interface between the Marine biology and Geochemistry Research groups.

This position is funded by an ERC Advanced Grant to Professor Gavin Foster titled “From microns to reefs: mechanistic insights into coral biomineralization and the destin of coral reefs” and the online management will be shared between Professor Foster (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/about/staff/glf1u08.page) and Dr D’angelo (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/about/staff/cda1w07.page). The project involves a number of researchers from the University of Southampton and aims to better understand the future of coral reefs in the face of anthropogenic changes by developing a mechanistic understanding of coral calcification. For more details, see this web page: http://www.thefosterlab.org/microns2reefs.

Scleractine corals have a complex biomineralization tool set which, although not fully understood, involves the use of a number of enzyme pumps to control the carbonate system of the calcifying fluid to promote CaCO.3 production and synthesis of an organic matrix that controls and potentially initiates crystal formation. The role of the candidate in this multidisciplinary project will be to identify the relative importance of the carbonate system in relation to the synthesis of the organic matrix in the biomineralization of coral. This will be achieved by growing a range of coral species under various controlled conditions, manipulating the energy budget and using a series of enzyme inhibitors. You will then use a variety of interdisciplinary techniques to explore the impact of these treatments on calcification rate, holobont physiology, skeletal organic matrix concentration and protein composition, and skeletal shape. Differential gene expression will also be used to identify how particular aspects of the coral biomineralization toolkit respond to a changing environment.

A successful candidate must have:

  • A doctorate * (or equivalent) in a biological or chemical field
  • Experience in the application of molecular biology or biochemical methods
  • Skills in hypothesis testing, experiment design, statistical analysis of datasets, and writing of scientific manuscripts and research reports in molecular biology / biochemistry.
  • Demonstrate strong motivation, ambition and motivation, with the ability to complete difficult tasks and meet deadlines both individually and as a member of a team.

Experience in growing corals, experimenting with marine species or laboratory model organisms or knowledge of micro-CT techniques for skeletal imaging would be an advantage, as would RNA analysis, omics techniques and data analysis / bioinformatics tools

This position is a three-year fixed-term appointment due to funding restrictions. For more information on the Marine Biology and Ecology group and related work at Southampton, follow these links:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/research/groups/marine_biology_and_ecology.page

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/research/facilities/corals.page

www.thefosterlab.org

For more information, please contact Professor Gavin Foster (gavin.foster@noc.soton.ac.uk) or Dr Cecilia D’Angelo (C.Dangelo@soton.ac.uk).

* Applications for Associate Researcher positions will be considered by applicants who are preparing or completing a relevant doctoral degree. The title of associate researcher will be applied upon successful completion of the doctorate. Prior to the award of the qualification, the title of Senior Research Assistant will be awarded.

Application procedure

You must submit your completed online application form to https://jobs.soton.ac.uk. The application deadline will be midnight on the closing date indicated above. If you need assistance, please call Annabelle Trimm (Recruiting Team) on +44 (0) 23 8059 4043 or email recruitment@soton.ac.uk Please quote ref 1515821HN on all correspondence.

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How the Virginia Coastal Wind Project is Affecting Marine Life https://mustangsailing.com/how-the-virginia-coastal-wind-project-is-affecting-marine-life/ Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/how-the-virginia-coastal-wind-project-is-affecting-marine-life/ [ad_1] NORFOLK, Virginia – Fishing is a way of life for Captain Ron Spangler. “I’m 73. Now I started with a fishing rod when I was probably nine or 10. I’ve been doing it all my life,” said Spangler, an angler at Fishhook Sport Fishing in Norfolk. As a fisherman with many years of experience, […]]]>


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NORFOLK, Virginia – Fishing is a way of life for Captain Ron Spangler.

“I’m 73. Now I started with a fishing rod when I was probably nine or 10. I’ve been doing it all my life,” said Spangler, an angler at Fishhook Sport Fishing in Norfolk.

As a fisherman with many years of experience, Spangler has no plans to hang up his rod anytime soon. That’s part of the reason he said Dominion Energy’s Virginia Coastal Wind Project is a hook, a line, and a sinker.

“It’s going to be amazing. That’s my personal opinion,” Spangler said.

Currently, there are two wind turbines about 27 miles off the Virginia Beach coast, designed to bring clean energy to Virginia.

“We use the wind as free fuel to run the turbines. Through the use of a magnet and a generator, they generated this electricity which goes through cables, it arrives ashore directly into the grid, ”said Kevin Carroll, director of operations and maintenance for the Virginia Coastal Wind Project. “That’s the equivalent of taking more than a million internal combustion engine vehicles off the road.”

There are currently two offshore wind turbines, but 180 are planned. Dominion Energy said the wind turbines will produce enough electricity for about 660,000 homes.

Carroll said the wind farm also promotes the thriving of marine life.

“When you put a structure in the water, marine life will grow on it. And in a sense, we are creating an ecosystem. We have seen tremendous growth and the number of marine species that have been around turbines where before there was nothing – now we have black bass, we have toads. It was quite impressive to be able to see that. “

Spangler said that during his trips to sea he saw a large number of new fish.

“The little fish are going to come, the bigger ones are going to come, then the bigger ones are going to come and the fishing is going to be fantastic. We have needed it for many years,” said Spangler. noted.

Carroll said Dominion was working with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science to monitor submarine growth.

“It’s not just the growth we’re going to see in marine life, there will also be growth in the job markets, not just for Dominion, but within the supply chain that is needed to be able to keep the turbines operational, ”he said.

The project should create 900 jobs in our region.

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The first refuge of marine life in Europe, soon in Lipsi https://mustangsailing.com/the-first-refuge-of-marine-life-in-europe-soon-in-lipsi/ https://mustangsailing.com/the-first-refuge-of-marine-life-in-europe-soon-in-lipsi/#respond Mon, 12 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/the-first-refuge-of-marine-life-in-europe-soon-in-lipsi/ [ad_1] Greek first in the protection of marine life Her goals Shelter for Aegean marine life, implemented by the Institute of Marine Protection “Archipelagos” with the support of the Municipality of Lipsi is to be the world’s first rehabilitation center for dolphins released from captivity. It will also provide specialized veterinary care to injured marine […]]]>


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Greek first in the protection of marine life

Her goals Shelter for Aegean marine life, implemented by the Institute of Marine Protection “Archipelagos” with the support of the Municipality of Lipsi is to be the world’s first rehabilitation center for dolphins released from captivity. It will also provide specialized veterinary care to injured marine species and will also function as a research and training center.

Until the end of 2021, will be ready to operate as marine animal care center when it has already started his research work.

“The construction works are progressing intensively,” he said Athens 9.84. the research director of the “Archipelagos” Institute of Marine Protection, Anastasia Snowy. “It is already functioning as a research center. An international team of scientists and students are at the shelter and making preparations for the shelter. At the same time, the process of finding resources to complete the veterinary clinic facilities and treatment zones is “in progress.” The authorization process is also underway. With the great interest that exists on the part of the Ministry of the Environment, we believe that the complex part of the bureaucracy will be resolved soon, There is also an interest in our financial support, always with very strict criteria so that those who financially support the project do not whitewash environmental disasters. we calculate by the end of 2021 to function fully as a treatment center and in 2022 to be able to accommodate former captive dolphins “.

Lipsi sets international standards

“The marine life sanctuary will be the first of its kind in Europe, a center for the care of marine animals (dolphins, turtles, seals)”, he added. Mrs. Milou. “We aim to fill this gap and an important parameter is also that the refuge be created in a remote region of Greece, in Lipsi, with the participation of the local community, sending the message that “The island of Greece can be a point of scientific research, innovation and protection of the marine environment, not only nationally but also globally.”

World first to welcome former captive dolphins

“The KAegean marine life shelter will be the only one in Europe and the world, which will offer long-lasting hospitality to dolphins released from captivity. Dolphins around the world are closing in. This year, for example when a dolphinarium closed in Paris one dolphin was killed by euthanasia and the others were transferred to other dolphinariums in the country to continue the forced performances. In Holland, 8 dolphins were sold in China in dolphinariums. If there had been safe havens for these abused animals and with the support of the growing international outcry, these wonderful mammals would have been saved. I believe that the way we design the shelter will be an example for other countries to emulate. Around 300 dolphins are currently in captivity in Europe.

That Greece be the first country to innovate and it will provide a solution to a global problem debated for decades, large sums have been spent but no solution has been found. ” concludes Mme Miliou.

The Shelter for Aegean Sea Life situated in Bay of Vroulia north-west of Lipsi, location that was chosen as the ideal after six years of extensive research. It is powered exclusively by renewable energy sources with a minimal plastic and carbon footprint.

Kalliopi Aslanidou

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Discarded fishing nets are a threat to corals and marine life https://mustangsailing.com/discarded-fishing-nets-are-a-threat-to-corals-and-marine-life/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/discarded-fishing-nets-are-a-threat-to-corals-and-marine-life/ Even some pristine tropical islands are not immune to the scourge of abandoned fishing nets. Fishermen around the world often throw and abandon their fishing nets and other plastic gear in the seas without a second thought. Out of sight, out of mind. Yet this plastic waste, which can take decades or even centuries to […]]]>

Even some pristine tropical islands are not immune to the scourge of abandoned fishing nets.

Fishermen around the world often throw and abandon their fishing nets and other plastic gear in the seas without a second thought. Out of sight, out of mind.

Yet this plastic waste, which can take decades or even centuries to degrade, adds to the colossal amounts of waste already lying around in the oceans and being washed away by currents and tides.

Worse still, discarded nets can devastate fragile marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and decimate vulnerable species such as sea turtles, which can drown if caught in these nets underwater.

Even pristine tropical islands may not be safe from the scourge of abandoned fishing nets. Recently, massive nets were discovered over a large area in Koh Losin, a small rocky islet located in the southern region of the Gulf of Thailand. Smothered under the fishing nets were various species of coral and marine life.

Koh Losin, which covers an area of ​​approximately 195 acres, is one of the best dive sites in Thailand. It is located 72 km from the nearest coast and its relative isolation means that the islet has remained virtually untouched and the marine ecosystems surrounding it have remained largely intact.

Beneath the surface of the azure waters around the islet are picturesque coral reefs, which are home to a large number of marine species. The local waters are also home to several rare and endangered marine animals, including whale sharks and manta rays.

Yet even in this isolated area, the scourge of plastic waste is already taking its toll.

Thailand is one of the world’s worst plastic polluters, dumping some 23 million kilograms of plastic waste into the sea every year. Derelict fishing gear from the country’s lucrative fishing industry accounts for much of the Southeast Asian nation plastic pollution.

Fishing nets abandoned on Koh Losin have been recovered by a group of divers. The surroundings of Koh Losin are protected by law, but the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has forced most local environmental inspectors to work from home and stop visiting protected sites.

Some fishermen have clearly taken advantage of this lull in inspections to fish illegally in the area before abandoning their nets there.

Their nets have damaged fragile corals while blocking sunlight from reaching underwater corals that contain photosynthetic algae called zooxanthellae in their tissues in a symbiotic relationship. Corals provide the algae with a safe home and the compounds necessary for photosynthesis while the algae reciprocate by supplying their hosts with oxygen and helping to remove waste.

It took two days to remove the nets covering the coral reefs around Koh Losin in a painstaking operation. In total, the recovered nets weighed 800 kg.

Yet, before the nets were removed, they had already snapped pieces of coral over a large area and started smothering them by causing their algae to grow on the nets.

“If the nets hadn’t been removed, the corals in the area would have absolutely died,” said marine biologist Anchalee Chankong.

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