Marine life – Mustang Sailing http://mustangsailing.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 08:06:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mustangsailing.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-120x120.png Marine life – Mustang Sailing http://mustangsailing.com/ 32 32 Massive bleaching of sea sponges can be devastating to New Zealand marine life https://mustangsailing.com/massive-bleaching-of-sea-sponges-can-be-devastating-to-new-zealand-marine-life/ Wed, 18 May 2022 08:06:55 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/massive-bleaching-of-sea-sponges-can-be-devastating-to-new-zealand-marine-life/ Marine scientists are worried about the ecosystem of our country’s largest national park, fearing that the mass bleaching of Fiordland’s native sea sponges is just the tip of the damage caused by climate change. Researchers have discovered bleached sea sponges for the first time in New Zealand – and it’s not good news. “It’s quite […]]]>

Marine scientists are worried about the ecosystem of our country’s largest national park, fearing that the mass bleaching of Fiordland’s native sea sponges is just the tip of the damage caused by climate change.

Researchers have discovered bleached sea sponges for the first time in New Zealand – and it’s not good news.

“It’s quite alarming,” says James Bell, professor of marine biology at Victoria University.

He says sponges, once healthy and brown, have been bleached out following a drastic change in temperature due to global warming, in some areas of Fiordland up to 95% of sponges are affected.

Laundering like this is a first in New Zealand – and rare in cold waters internationally.

READ MORE: Most Great Barrier Reef corals surveyed this year have been bleached

He says the true extent of the damage has yet to be discovered.

Sea sponges are an essential part of the Fiordland marine ecosystem, they provide habitat for organisms to live in and filter food for fish.

“Given the vast area in which this species occurs in Fiordland, you could be talking about hundreds of thousands or even millions of individual sponges that have actually been bleached.”

The heatwave may also have had a direct impact on other native marine species.

“It’s entirely possible that other species were affected by this heatwave, it just so happens that the bleaching and color change is very obvious to spot.”

The Fiordland Marine Guardians were established to advise the government on the management of the Fiordland marine area.

President Rebecca McLeod said the news came as a shock to the group.

“James Bell came to our meeting a few weeks ago and showed us some of the photos and videos and I think everyone was very quiet, but it took us a while to understand the seriousness of this discovery.

“We were hoping it would be a really localized mortality event, but it appears to be across the entire Fiordland marine area, which is a massive area of ​​New Zealand’s coastline.

“Usually we feel quite helpless…it’s quite a crushing blow.”

The damage comes as climate change causes fluctuating ocean temperatures to rise in recent years.

Dr Robert Smith is a lecturer in the Department of Marine Science at the University of Otago and works with the government-funded Moana Project to record and study ocean temperatures.

He says marine heat waves are becoming more common as a result of global warming. In April, parts of the South Island were hit with some of the hottest waters on record.

“I was really surprised at how much these temperatures have warmed up, especially off the coast of Fiordland.

“The water temperature peaked at 5 degrees Celsius above normal, actual temperatures were around 20 degrees, and that’s a record for this time of year.”

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Tiles that support sea life added to seawalls in S’pore https://mustangsailing.com/tiles-that-support-sea-life-added-to-seawalls-in-spore/ Sun, 08 May 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/tiles-that-support-sea-life-added-to-seawalls-in-spore/ SINGAPORE – While seawalls are Singapore’s traditional coastal defense against rising sea levels, scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS) are redesigning them to ensure they don’t come at the expense of of underwater life. Despite the ability of the underwater parts of some man-made defenses to support coral communities, intertidal dykes do not […]]]>

SINGAPORE – While seawalls are Singapore’s traditional coastal defense against rising sea levels, scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS) are redesigning them to ensure they don’t come at the expense of of underwater life.

Despite the ability of the underwater parts of some man-made defenses to support coral communities, intertidal dykes do not support the same rich biodiversity as natural coasts, said Associate Professor Peter Todd of the Marine Ecology Experimental Laboratory of the NUS.

More than 65% of the natural shorelines here have been transformed into harsh coastal structures such as seawalls and rocky slopes.

This should grow by the end of the century. In 2019, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced that $100 billion or more could be needed in the long term to protect Singapore against rising sea levels, including plans to strengthen coastal defenses.

To reduce the impact of existing seawalls on sea creatures, NUS scientists have developed an assortment of tiles that can be retrofitted to seawalls to mimic features of the natural habitat.

Concrete tiles, from wedge-shaped “rock pools” to domes depending on the surface they are placed on, act as optimized homes to enhance the variety of marine life.

The results of their studies show that they can double the diversity of marine organisms on gray marine infrastructure, Professor Todd said.

He added: “The tiles can support between 20 and 25 species compared to a traditional granite dike, which has around 10 species. These organisms include algae, bivalves, many marine snails, and some crustaceans.

Although these organisms may not seem charismatic, they are important food sources to support larger organisms such as fish in the littoral ecosystem, he said.

Currently, 350 tiles are installed in Changi Bay and another 60 in Sentosa, according to Professor Todd.

After 12 years of experimenting with different designs and materials, the tiles were also designed to withstand Singapore’s tropical climate, which can see seawall temperatures soar to 50 degrees Celsius, Prof Todd said.

Going forward, the team is refining the tiles to be more environmentally friendly, experimenting with different types of green concrete.

The tiles are designed to last 20 years, but this can vary depending on how exposed the shoreline is to waves, Prof Todd said.

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Global warming risks the most cataclysmic extinction of marine life in 250 million years https://mustangsailing.com/global-warming-risks-the-most-cataclysmic-extinction-of-marine-life-in-250-million-years/ Fri, 06 May 2022 10:03:35 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/global-warming-risks-the-most-cataclysmic-extinction-of-marine-life-in-250-million-years/ This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate office collaboration. Global warming is causing the world’s oceans to change so drastically that it risks leading to a mass extinction of marine species that rivals anything that has happened in Earth’s history over tens of millions of […]]]>

This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate office collaboration.

Global warming is causing the world’s oceans to change so drastically that it risks leading to a mass extinction of marine species that rivals anything that has happened in Earth’s history over tens of millions of years, new research has warned.

Accelerating climate change is having a “profound” impact on ocean ecosystems that “increases extinction risk and reduces marine biological richness compared to what has been observed in Earth’s history over the past decades millions of years,” according to the study.

Global seawater temperatures are steadily rising due to extra heat produced by burning fossil fuels, while oxygen levels in the ocean are plunging and water is becoming acidic from the absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

This means the oceans are overheated, gasping for air – the volume of completely oxygen-depleted ocean waters has quadrupled since the 1960s – and becoming more hostile to life. Aquatic creatures such as clams, mussels, and shrimp are unable to properly form shells due to acidification of seawater.

All of this means the planet could be sliding into a “mass extinction rivaling those of Earth’s past”, says the new research, published in Science. The pressures of increasing heat and loss of oxygen are, researchers say, uncomfortably reminiscent of the mass extinction event that occurred at the end of the Permian period about 250 million years ago. years. This cataclysm, known as the “great death”, led to the disappearance of 96% of the planet’s marine animals.

“Even if the magnitude of species loss is not at the same level as this, the mechanism of species loss would be the same,” said Justin Penn, a climatologist at Princeton University, co- author of the new research.

“The future of life in the oceans is highly dependent on what we decide to do with greenhouse gases today. There are two very different oceans we could see, one devoid of much life that we see today, based on what we see with CO2 emissions in the future.

Truly catastrophic levels of extinction could be reached if the world were to emit rampant planetary-warming gases, resulting in an average warming of more than 4 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times by the end of this century, according to research. This would trigger extinctions that would reshape ocean life for centuries as temperatures continue to climb.

But even in the best-case scenarios, the world is still expected to lose a significant portion of its marine life. At 2 degrees Celsius of warming above the pre-industrial norm, which is projected as likely even under current climate commitments from world governments, around 4% of the roughly 2 million species in the oceans will be wiped out.

Fish and marine mammals that live in polar regions are the most vulnerable, according to the study, because they will not be able to migrate to cooler climates, unlike tropical species. “They won’t have anywhere to go,” Penn said.

The threat of climate change amplifies other major dangers facing aquatic life, such as overfishing and pollution. Between 10% and 15% of marine species are already at risk of extinction due to these various threats, according to the study, drawing on data from the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

John Bruno, a marine ecologist at the University of North Carolina who was not involved in the study, said the new research seemed “sound”, but differed from previous studies on the subject which suggest that species will mostly disperse into new areas rather than being completely. muffled.

“It’s very different from what most previous work has developed. But that doesn’t mean they’re wrong,” Bruno said. “I think this new work challenges some of our current assumptions about geographic patterns of impending extinction in the ocean.”

Bruno said that while mass extinctions are likely due to extreme warming in the future, the current impacts of climate change and other threats should be of sufficient concern to policymakers and the public.

“Personally, I’m much more worried about the ecosystem degradation that we’re already seeing after less than 1 degree Celsius of warming,” he said.

“We don’t need to look to a world so warmed that humanity has been wiped out – we are already losing untold biodiversity and functioning ecosystems, even with the relatively modest warming of the past 50 years.”


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Global warming risks the most cataclysmic extinction of marine life in 250 million years | Climate crisis https://mustangsailing.com/global-warming-risks-the-most-cataclysmic-extinction-of-marine-life-in-250-million-years-climate-crisis/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/global-warming-risks-the-most-cataclysmic-extinction-of-marine-life-in-250-million-years-climate-crisis/ Global warming is causing the world’s oceans to change so drastically that it risks leading to a mass extinction of marine species that rivals anything that has happened in Earth’s history over tens of millions of years, new research has warned. Accelerating climate change is having a “profound” impact on ocean ecosystems that “increases extinction […]]]>

Global warming is causing the world’s oceans to change so drastically that it risks leading to a mass extinction of marine species that rivals anything that has happened in Earth’s history over tens of millions of years, new research has warned.

Accelerating climate change is having a “profound” impact on ocean ecosystems that “increases extinction risk and reduces marine biological richness compared to what has been observed in Earth’s history over the past decades millions of years,” according to the study.

Global seawater temperatures are steadily rising due to extra heat produced by burning fossil fuels, while oxygen levels in the ocean are plunging and water is becoming acidic from the absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

This means the oceans are overheated, gasping for air – the volume of completely oxygen-depleted ocean waters has quadrupled since the 1960s – and becoming more hostile to life. Aquatic creatures such as clams, mussels, and shrimp are unable to properly form shells due to acidification of seawater.

All of this means the planet could slide into a “mass extinction rivaling those of Earth’s past”, says the new research, published in Science. The pressures of increasing heat and oxygen loss are, researchers say, uncomfortably reminiscent of the mass extinction event that occurred at the end of the Permian period about 250 million years ago. years. This cataclysm, known as the “Great Death”, led to the disappearance of up to 96% of the planet’s marine animals.

“Even if the magnitude of species loss is not at the same level as this, the mechanism of species loss would be the same,” said Justin Penn, a climatologist at Princeton University, co- author of the new research.

“The future of life in the oceans is highly dependent on what we decide to do with greenhouse gases today. There are two very different oceans we could see, one devoid of much life that we see today, based on what we see with CO2 emissions in the future.

Truly catastrophic levels of extinction could be reached if the world were to emit rampant planetary-warming gases, resulting in an average warming of more than 4°C above pre-industrial times by the end of this century, according to research. This would trigger extinctions that would reshape ocean life for centuries as temperatures continue to climb.

But even in the best-case scenarios, the world is still expected to lose a significant portion of its marine life. At 2°C warming above the pre-industrial norm, which is projected as likely even under current climate commitments from world governments, about 4% of the roughly two million species in the oceans will be wiped out.

Fish and marine mammals that live in polar regions are the most vulnerable, according to the study, because they will not be able to migrate to cooler climates, unlike tropical species. “They won’t have anywhere to go,” Penn said.

The threat of climate change amplifies other major dangers facing aquatic life, such as overfishing and pollution. Between 10% and 15% of marine species are already at risk of extinction due to these various threats, according to the study, drawing on data from the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

John Bruno, a marine ecologist at the University of North Carolina who was not involved in the study, said the new research seemed “sound”, but differed from previous studies on the subject which suggest that species will mostly disperse into new areas rather than being completely. muffled.

“It’s very different from what most previous work has developed. But that doesn’t mean they’re wrong,” Bruno said. “I think this new work challenges some of our current assumptions about geographic patterns of impending extinction in the ocean.”

Bruno said that while mass extinctions are likely due to extreme warming in the future, the current impacts of climate change and other threats should be of sufficient concern to policymakers and the public.

“Personally, I’m much more worried about the ecosystem degradation that we’re already seeing after less than 1°C of warming,” he said.

“We don’t need to look to a world so warmed that humanity has been wiped out – we are already losing untold biodiversity and functioning ecosystems, even with the relatively modest warming of the past 50 years.”

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Seabed dredging ban could help marine life https://mustangsailing.com/seabed-dredging-ban-could-help-marine-life/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 16:50:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/seabed-dredging-ban-could-help-marine-life/ Published: 17:50 18 April 2022 Protecting vast underwater sandbars off the north Norfolk coast could lead to a regeneration of underwater life and an increase in ‘eco-tourism’ such as diving expeditions, it is hoped. The government has presented plans to ban ‘bottom trawling’ and dredging in areas such as Inner Dowsing, Race Bank and North […]]]>

Published:
17:50 18 April 2022



Protecting vast underwater sandbars off the north Norfolk coast could lead to a regeneration of underwater life and an increase in ‘eco-tourism’ such as diving expeditions, it is hoped.

The government has presented plans to ban ‘bottom trawling’ and dredging in areas such as Inner Dowsing, Race Bank and North Ridge off the Norfolk coast, as well as the large area of ​​Dogger Bank which lies lies about 60 miles off the east coast of Yorkshire.

The measures aim to protect delicate underwater habitats from damaging fishing practices and have been described as “the start of the rewilding of the North Sea”.

Rob Spray, chairman of the action group Marine Conservation for Norfolk, said the ban was unlikely to lead to a diving boom at Dogger Bank, due to its distance from the coast and difficult depth from 20 to 30 m.

But Mr Spray, who also runs a marine environment project called Seasearch East, said the measure would help the overall North Sea environment, which would become more attractive for low-impact ‘eco-tourism’ as that he would recover.


A diver explores a wreck off the North Norfolk coast. It is hoped that a further ban on dredging in sandbar areas of the North Sea will help marine life recover.
– Credit: Provided by Cristal Seas Scuba

“Dogger Bank would still be an advanced dive because you have to travel so far from shore and you have to be prepared for an exposed area,” he said. “But by protecting a large enough area, you create that kind of biological momentum for environmental recovery.”

Charles Clover, Executive Director of the Blue Marine Foundation, said: “We are delighted that the government has finally succeeded in protecting the Dogger Bank and the other three sites, which it promised to do a year ago.

“The Dogger itself is the size of the Bristol Channel so protecting it from damaging activity is a huge and welcome precedent for the protection of all of our marine protected areas off the UK which were once, almost all, “ paper parks”.

“This is the beginning of the rewilding of the North Sea.”

Karl Elliott, of Wymondham-based Scuba Libre – which operates dive trips off the north Norfolk coast, also welcomed the ban.

Mr Elliot said: ‘The action of trawling gear on the ground is causing extreme damage, and there is an awful lot of gear becoming numerous and causing danger to marine life.’

John Davies, a Cromer fisherman and president of the North Norfolk Fishermen’s Society, said crab and lobster fishermen on the coast should not be affected by the ban as they used traps, which did not scrape the seabed .

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Oil tanker sinks off Tunisia, threatening marine life https://mustangsailing.com/oil-tanker-sinks-off-tunisia-threatening-marine-life/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 15:52:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/oil-tanker-sinks-off-tunisia-threatening-marine-life/ The Navy rescues the crew; authorities activate ‘national emergency plan’ to prevent pollution from oil spill The Navy rescues the crew; authorities activate ‘national emergency plan’ to prevent pollution from oil spill Tunisian authorities stepped up their efforts on Saturday to avert an environmental catastrophe after the sinking on Friday off Gabes of a fuel […]]]>

The Navy rescues the crew; authorities activate ‘national emergency plan’ to prevent pollution from oil spill

The Navy rescues the crew; authorities activate ‘national emergency plan’ to prevent pollution from oil spill

Tunisian authorities stepped up their efforts on Saturday to avert an environmental catastrophe after the sinking on Friday off Gabes of a fuel merchant ship carrying a thousand tonnes of fuel.

The Tunisian navy rescued the seven crew members of the vessel, which was heading from Equatorial Guinea to Malta, and sent out a distress call seven miles from the southern town of Gabes, the sources added.

The cause of the incident was bad weather, the environment ministry said, adding that water had seeped into the ship, reaching a height of two meters.

The crew of the ship Xelo had made a distress call on Friday evening and had taken refuge in Tunisian waters against bad weather before sinking in the Gulf of Gabes in the morning, authorities said.

Environment Minister Leila Chikhaoui said on Saturday that “the situation is under control” in an interview broadcast on state television.

“There are minimal leaks, which are not even visible to the naked eye and fortunately the oil evaporates, so there should be no disaster in the Gulf of Gabes,” said Mohamed Karray, door-keeper. word of a Gabes court.

The tanker is 58m long and 9m wide, according to ship monitoring website shiptracker.com.

It began to take on water about 7 km offshore in the Gulf of Gabes and the engine room was engulfed, according to the ministry statement.

He said Tunisian authorities had evacuated the seven-member crew.

Polluted waters

Ms. Chikhaoui was traveling to Gabès “to assess the situation… and take the necessary preventive decisions in coordination with the regional authorities”, according to a press release from the ministry.

The authorities have activated “the national emergency plan for the prevention of marine pollution with the aim of controlling the situation and preventing the spread of pollutants”.

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Higher, stronger and better for marine life https://mustangsailing.com/higher-stronger-and-better-for-marine-life/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 13:24:58 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/higher-stronger-and-better-for-marine-life/ MIAMI — Seawalls, despite more natural innovations like “living” shorelines, go nowhere in Florida — except uphill. With thousands of miles of coastline facing sea level rise by 2060, some cities and counties, including Miami-Dade, are already calling for increased standard levee heights. And many of the breakwaters to come in the coming decades promise […]]]>

MIAMI — Seawalls, despite more natural innovations like “living” shorelines, go nowhere in Florida — except uphill.

With thousands of miles of coastline facing sea level rise by 2060, some cities and counties, including Miami-Dade, are already calling for increased standard levee heights. And many of the breakwaters to come in the coming decades promise to be different – not only stronger and more durable, but better designed to absorb waves and reduce damage to the adjacent sea or bay floor.

A new approach being developed by the University of Miami is even specifically designed to provide habitat for corals, mangroves and other marine life.

“We have to stop doing things the way we have done for the past few decades,” said Esber Andiroglu, an associate professor at the University of Miami who specializes in building the levees of the future. “Now is the time to innovate”

He is among university scientists and private companies designing new technologies to improve levee construction, which is expected to be a booming business in the coming decades. According to one estimate, it could cost $75 billion to raise and repair all existing walls in Florida by 2040.

Harder, better, faster, stronger

The first thing you’ll notice about the brand new seawall along the Treasures on the Bay Condominium in North Bay Village is that it’s taller than it was before. The other major change is impossible to detect because it’s locked in concrete.

About 50 feet of the levee cap is not interwoven with the usual steel rods, called rebar, which reinforce the vast majority of buildings. Instead, it uses fiberglass reinforced polymer bars. It is twice as strong as steel, weighs approximately 75% less and above all, it does not corrode.

This is a common weakness with rebar used in projects exposed to salty air and water. This is why so many older coastal buildings begin to show menacing cracks if left unattended.

“Reinforcement with polymer fibers would completely eliminate this problem,” said Andiroglu, who designed the new seawall. Polymer rebar is well tested, he said, and increasingly used by the Florida Department of Transportation on projects vulnerable to salt air.

The initial cost is about 10-15% more than steel, he said, but in the long run it will be cheaper because it has a much longer lifespan – 100 years or more. , according to some studies. And the price is likely to come down as its use becomes more common.

Levees designed as LEGO bricks could also help reduce the costs of building them in the future. Andiroglu’s lab is experimenting with modular pieces that could be added as needed. This could be helpful as rising sea levels push higher coastal building codes.

“People always say ‘but if I build it too high I lose my sight’, and ‘that’s not going to happen in my lifetime,'” he said. “The modular features allow people to add height to the levees as they go. It will also reduce the financial burden over several decades.

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Coral-friendly concrete

The main ingredient of levees – concrete – is also ripe for change. It’s a big contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, which exacerbate climate change, and it can deteriorate in humid, salty environments like South Florida.

“Concrete is pretty much the most widely used material in the world,” said Prannoy Suraneni, an assistant professor at UM dedicated to finding better concrete, not only for engineering, but also for the environment. .

Suraneni said it’s relatively simple to replace ingredients in concrete to make it more durable. There’s already an option called ultra-high performance concrete, and builders across the country are starting to use it more, but it doesn’t solve all the problems, especially on the environmental side.

“How to make concrete resilient or coral-friendly is much more difficult,” he said.

Research already shows that a sea wall with a variety of textures will attract different forms of sea life better than a completely smooth wall. His team is also studying how the chemical makeup of different concrete mixes — alkalinity and other additives — promotes healthier growth of marine life, a question that is still unresolved.

Perhaps the most revolutionary change would be to use salt water rather than fresh water in concrete dykes – a change that would reduce costs and be particularly useful in countries where drinking water is depleted. .

After several years of research and experiments, Suraneni said he was convinced that seawater could be used in concrete, as long as the steel rebars inside were also replaced. Steel and salt just don’t mix.

“There is no doubt that you can use seawater in concrete. The main problem is that the steel we use in concrete is susceptible to corrosion,” he said. “So don’t use steel in these circumstances. Use fiberglass reinforced polymer.”

Introducing SEAHIVE

Although seawalls protect the land, they are not so good for marine life. When a wave crashes into a mangrove forest, or even a pile of rocks, it breaks that force. But when a wave crashes into a straight levee, all that energy is channeled downward, eroding the adjacent seabed and marine life.

In Miami-Dade, that’s why new levees must have a pile of rock — known as rip rap — at their base. In some places, rocks are piled high enough to stick out of the water, and mangroves and other coastal plants will take root there.

This is what inspired a group of UM scientists to design a rockfill replacement, designed with mangroves and other plants in mind. They call it SEAHIVE, a reference to the six-sided tubes that stack together to look like a beehive honeycomb.

“Think of it as an airbag. It dissipates energy by letting water in,” said Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos, assistant professor at the University of Miami School of Engineering and leader of the SEAHIVE research team.

After three years of testing the structures in water tanks, the team is moving on to real-world pilot projects. One will be placed near a seawall in North Bay Village, another off Miami Beach as an artificial coral reef, and a third will debut this summer in Pompano Beach for a dive park project called Wahoo. Bay.

The plan is to plant mangroves and corals on SEAHIVE structures in the sunken park so residents – especially children – can swim and experience nature firsthand.

“We expect the main attraction to be school groups,” said Rob Wyre, president of Shipwreck Park, creator of another dive park in Broward County. “It’s a blank canvas as far as what’s going to happen on the education side.”

Once they’re in place, Rhode-Barbarigos said his team will measure everything from the reaction of fish and plants to how well the structures work to break up the waves. To guard against corrosion and crumbling, they will be constructed with the same plastic polymers as the North Bay Village condominium seawall. If all goes well, he said this technology could be an easy-to-deploy solution for South Florida’s waterfront towns.

“We wanted something robust, easy to implement, easy to manufacture, accessible,” he said. “You can always push the limits of very high technology later. We need the low-tech solution to have sustainable and equitable development.

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Florida’s levees of the future: taller, stronger and better for marine life https://mustangsailing.com/floridas-levees-of-the-future-taller-stronger-and-better-for-marine-life/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/floridas-levees-of-the-future-taller-stronger-and-better-for-marine-life/ Levees, despite more natural innovations like “living” shorelines, go nowhere in Florida – except uphill. With thousands of miles of coastline facing two feet of sea level rise by 2060, some cities and counties, including Miami-Dade, are already calling for increased standard levee heights. And many of the breakwaters to come in the coming decades […]]]>

Levees, despite more natural innovations like “living” shorelines, go nowhere in Florida – except uphill.

With thousands of miles of coastline facing two feet of sea level rise by 2060, some cities and counties, including Miami-Dade, are already calling for increased standard levee heights. And many of the breakwaters to come in the coming decades promise to be different – not only stronger and more durable, but better designed to absorb waves and reduce damage to the adjacent sea or bay floor.

READ MORE: Mangroves versus dykes? The mix may be the ‘best of both worlds’ to deal with rising South Florida seas

A new approach being developed by the University of Miami is even specifically designed to provide habitat for corals, mangroves and other marine life.

“We have to stop doing things the way we have done for the past few decades,” said Esber Andiroglu, an associate professor at the University of Miami who specializes in building the levees of the future. “Now is the time for innovation.”

He is among university scientists and private companies designing new technologies to improve levee construction, which is expected to be a booming business in the coming decades. According to one estimate, it could cost $75 billion to raise and repair all existing walls in Florida by 2040.

HARDER, BETTER, FASTER, STRONGER

The first thing you’ll notice about the brand new seawall along the Treasures on the Bay Condominium in North Bay Village is that it’s taller than it was before. The other major change is impossible to detect because it’s locked in concrete.

About 50 feet of the levee cap is not interwoven with the usual steel rods, called rebar, which reinforce the vast majority of buildings. Instead, it uses fiberglass reinforced polymer bars. It is twice as strong as steel, weighs approximately 75% less and above all, it does not corrode.

This is a common weakness with rebar used in projects exposed to salty air and water. This is why so many older coastal buildings begin to show menacing cracks if left unattended.

“Reinforcement with polymer fibers would completely eliminate this problem,” said Andiroglu, who designed the new seawall. Polymer rebar is well tested, he said, and increasingly used by the Florida Department of Transportation on projects vulnerable to salt air.

The initial cost is about 10-15% more than steel, he said, but in the long run it will be cheaper because it has a much longer lifespan – 100 years or more. , according to some studies. And the price is likely to come down as its use becomes more common.

Levees designed as LEGO bricks could also help reduce the costs of building them in the future. Andiroglu’s lab is experimenting with modular pieces that could be added as needed. This could be helpful as rising sea levels push higher coastal building codes.

“People always say ‘but if I build it too high I’m wasting my views’ and ‘it won’t happen in my lifetime,'” he said. “The modular features allow people to add height to the dikes as they go. It will also reduce the financial burden over several decades.

University of Miami via Miami Herald

/

The UM researchers experimented with growing corals and other sea life on pieces of concrete with varying levels of acidity to see if it made a difference.

CORAL-FRIENDLY CONCRETE

The main ingredient of levees – concrete – is also ripe for change. It’s a big contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, which exacerbate climate change, and it can deteriorate in humid, salty environments like South Florida.

“Concrete is pretty much the most widely used material in the world,” said Prannoy Suraneni, an assistant professor at UM dedicated to finding better concrete, not only for engineering, but also for the environment. .

Suraneni said it’s relatively simple to replace ingredients in concrete to make it more durable. There’s already an option called ultra-high performance concrete, and builders across the country are starting to use it more, but it doesn’t solve all the problems, especially on the environmental side.

“How to make concrete resilient or coral-friendly is much more difficult,” he said.

Research already shows that a sea wall with a variety of textures will attract different forms of sea life better than a completely smooth wall. His team is also studying how the chemical makeup of different concrete mixes — alkalinity and other additives — promotes healthier growth of marine life, a question that is still unresolved.

Perhaps the most revolutionary change would be to use salt water rather than fresh water in concrete dykes – a change that would reduce costs and be particularly useful in countries where drinking water is depleted. .

After several years of research and experiments, Suraneni said he was convinced that seawater could be used in concrete, as long as the steel rebars inside were also replaced. Steel and salt just don’t mix.

“There is no doubt that you can use seawater in concrete. The main problem is that the steel we use in concrete is susceptible to corrosion,” he said. “So don’t use steel in these circumstances. Use fiberglass reinforced polymer.”

A rendering showing what Wahoo Bay, a sunken park planned for Hillsboro Inlet near Pompano Beach, might look like when built.

Gallo Herbert Architects via Miami Herald

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A rendering showing what Wahoo Bay, a sunken park planned for Hillsboro Inlet near Pompano Beach, might look like when built. The project will feature SEAHIVE technology from the University of Miami.

PRESENTATION OF SEAHIVE

Although seawalls protect the land, they are not so good for marine life. When a wave crashes into a mangrove forest, or even a pile of rocks, it breaks that force. But when a wave crashes into a straight levee, all that energy is channeled downward, eroding the adjacent seabed and marine life.

In Miami-Dade, that’s why new levees must have a pile of rock — known as rip rap — at their base. In some places, rocks are piled high enough to stick out of the water, and mangroves and other coastal plants will take root there.

This is what inspired a group of UM scientists to design a rockfill replacement, designed with mangroves and other plants in mind. They call it SEAHIVE, a reference to the six-sided tubes that stack together to look like a beehive honeycomb.

“Think of it as an airbag. It dissipates energy by allowing water to enter it,” said Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos, assistant professor at the University of Miami School of Engineering and leader of the SEAHIVE research team. .

After three years of testing the structures in water tanks, the team is moving on to real-world pilot projects. One will be placed near a seawall in North Bay Village, another off Miami Beach as an artificial coral reef, and a third will debut this summer in Pompano Beach for a dive park project called Wahoo. Bay.

A rendering showing what Wahoo Bay, a sunken park planned for Hillsboro Inlet near Pompano Beach, might look like when built.

Gallo Herbert Architects via Miami Herald

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A rendering showing what Wahoo Bay, a sunken park planned for Hillsboro Inlet near Pompano Beach, might look like when built. The project will feature SEAHIVE technology from the University of Miami.

The plan is to plant mangroves and corals on SEAHIVE structures in the sunken park so residents – especially children – can swim and experience nature firsthand.

“We expect the main attraction to be school groups,” said Rob Wyre, president of Shipwreck Park, creator of another dive park in Broward County. “It’s a blank canvas as far as what’s going to happen on the education side.”

Once they’re in place, Rhode-Barbarigos said his team will measure everything from the reaction of fish and plants to how well the structures work to break up the waves. To guard against corrosion and crumbling, they will be constructed with the same plastic polymers as the North Bay Village condominium seawall. If all goes well, he said this technology could be an easy-to-deploy solution for South Florida’s waterfront towns.

“We wanted something robust, easy to implement, easy to manufacture, accessible,” he said. “You can always push the limits of very high technology later. We need the low-tech solution to have sustainable and equitable development.

This story was produced by the Miami Herald in partnership with the Florida Climate Reporting Network, a multi-newsroom initiative founded by the Miami Herald, South Florida Sun Sentinel, Palm Beach Post, Orlando Sentinel, WLRN Public Media and the Tampa Bay. Time.

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Growing focus on preservation and protection of marine life and ecosystem is driving expansion of global ballast water treatment systems market https://mustangsailing.com/growing-focus-on-preservation-and-protection-of-marine-life-and-ecosystem-is-driving-expansion-of-global-ballast-water-treatment-systems-market/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 03:29:05 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/growing-focus-on-preservation-and-protection-of-marine-life-and-ecosystem-is-driving-expansion-of-global-ballast-water-treatment-systems-market/ The emergence of low-cost and environmentally friendly ballast water treatment systems is generating new market potentials and new opportunities, according to Fact.MR. Growing environmental concerns are expected to propel eco-friendly systems around the world. Conserving the marine ecosystem is becoming imperative as pollution levels increase across the world in multiple ways. Therefore, systems that can […]]]>

The emergence of low-cost and environmentally friendly ballast water treatment systems is generating new market potentials and new opportunities, according to Fact.MR. Growing environmental concerns are expected to propel eco-friendly systems around the world. Conserving the marine ecosystem is becoming imperative as pollution levels increase across the world in multiple ways. Therefore, systems that can save the marine ecosystem from harmful microorganisms and pollutants are expected to be most sought after, fueling the growth of the Ballast Water Treatment Systems (BWTS) market.

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Additionally, governments and regulatory bodies around the world are putting in place regulatory measures and policies to ensure environmental safety and sustainability. For example, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has published guidelines for owners and manufacturers of water treatment systems to follow to ensure minimal harm to the environment. In addition, manufacturers come up with innovative technologies to develop equipment with compact designs to save space and ensure safety. Companies are also developing filterless systems that don’t need generators to operate, making them cost effective and environmentally friendly.

Fact.MR forecasts the global ballast water treatment systems market to grow at an impressive CAGR of 10% over the forecast period of 2020 to 2030.

Key Points from the Ballast Water Treatment Systems Market Report

  • The global ballast water treatment systems market is expected to reach a market valuation of nearly US$9 billion by the end of 2030.
  • Chemical treatment systems dominate the market; however, physical processing systems are expected to grow significantly over the next decade.
  • North America and Europe currently dominate the BWTS market. Asia-Pacific is expected to be the most lucrative BWTS market during the forecast period.
  • Ballast water treatment systems with tank capacity of 1,500 to 5,000 m3 are expected to dominate demand in the near future.
  • The demand for environmentally friendly water treatment systems is driving the market and is also expected to fuel the growth in the near future.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic crisis has hit international trade and transportation resulting in a drop in demand for ballast water treatment systems.

“Eco-friendly ballast water treatment systems that don’t harm the environment will grow in popularity over the years,” says an analyst at Fact.MR.

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Key Questions Answered in Fact.MR’s BWTS Market Report

  • Which regions will remain the most profitable regional markets for players in the Ballast Water Treatment Systems market?
  • What factors will cause the demand for ballast water treatment systems to change over the assessment period?
  • What will be the impact of changing trends on the Ballast Water Treatment Systems market?
  • How can market players seize short-term opportunities in the BWTS market in developed regions?
  • Which Companies Dominate the Ballast Water Treatment Systems Market?
  • What are the winning strategies of players in the ballast water treatment systems market to position themselves in this landscape?

Ballast Water Treatment Systems Market: Competitive Landscape

Players in the global ballast water treatment systems market view mergers, acquisitions, partnerships, and collaborations as a key focus to gain an edge over the competition. Technological advancements as well as expansion strategies are expected to remain key strategies during the forecast period.

Danish company Bawat has launched a new low-cost, “green” ballast water treatment technology. It is powered by waste heat from the ship’s engine. This system requires no filters, chemicals or UV lamps. The Bawat system operates at temperatures ranging from 64°C to 72°C, killing marine organisms in a single process in less time, which promises to minimize the risk of delays or disruptions during cargo handling operations .

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Some of the major players operating in the global ballast water treatment systems market are Wärtsilä Corporation, Damen Shipyards Group, ALFA LAVAL, atg Evoque (Evoque Water Technologies), GenSys GmbH, Evac, Coldharbour Marine Ltd., Ecochlor, GEA Group Aktiengesellschaft, ERMA FIRST ESK Engineering SA, Ferrate Treatment Technologies, LLC, Veolia Water Technologies, Hitachi, Auramarine Ltd. and Bawat a/s.

More Valuable Insights into Ballast Water Treatment Systems Market

In its latest report, Fact.MR has provided an unbiased analysis of the Global Ballast Water Treatment Systems Market including historical statistics data (2015-2019) and demand forecast for the period 2020-2030 The report discusses essential information about the Ballast Water Treatment Systems market in terms of treatment (chemical treatment and physical treatment), tank capacity (less than 1500 m3, 1500 – 5000 m3 and above 5,000 m3) and application (stationary and portable), in 5 key regions (North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa).

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Vattenfall wonders if marine life can settle inside wind turbine foundations https://mustangsailing.com/vattenfall-wonders-if-marine-life-can-settle-inside-wind-turbine-foundations/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://mustangsailing.com/vattenfall-wonders-if-marine-life-can-settle-inside-wind-turbine-foundations/ Vattenfall wonders if marine life can settle inside wind turbine foundations April 7 (Renewables Now) – Swedish utility Vattenfall AB and Dutch nature conservation organization De Rijke Noordzee are conducting research into how and to what extent the interiors of offshore wind turbine foundations can be used by the marine life for settlement and shelter, […]]]>

Vattenfall wonders if marine life can settle inside wind turbine foundations

April 7 (Renewables Now) – Swedish utility Vattenfall AB and Dutch nature conservation organization De Rijke Noordzee are conducting research into how and to what extent the interiors of offshore wind turbine foundations can be used by the marine life for settlement and shelter, and as a feeding ground.

The study is carried out on the 1.5 GW Hollandse Kust Zuid (HKZ) wind farm, located 18-34 kilometers from the Dutch coast, between the city of The Hague and Zandvoort. The project applies Nature Inclusive Design (NID) principles, adopting features such as water replenishment holes in the monopiles and rock reefs above the scour protection. These holes allow fish and other marine life to enter and exit again.

Vattenfall noted that this joint study with De Rijke Noordzee marks the first time research has been conducted to determine what water replenishment holes could mean for marine life. Both parties are also joined in this initiative by the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ).

Data will be collected several times over the next two years to monitor the evolution of biodiversity. The first series of measurements was carried out last winter.

“If the results meet our expectations, it will boost marine biodiversity,” commented Erwin Coolen, program director De Rijke Noordzee.

The 140-turbine HKZ offshore wind project is owned by Vattenfall and German chemical company BASF SE (ETR: BAS) and is expected to become operational next year.

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